People may not like change but an organisation’s capability to change will indicate both skill and depth.

So often it is said that people do not like change and yet we are living through a period of great change. Although many may wish to resist change, or even slowly adapt to change, it is a reality we all need to accept and understand.

It has even become a cliché that the pace of change is faster than ever. This can be debated but certainly, new agendas are influencing decisions in business all the time – technology, climate change, sustainability, energy, political instability, and even the regional differences in the pandemic. How many, even in December, forecast the Russia-Ukraine war and issues which have impacted directly onto business?

Every leadership team is asking two questions:

· What shall we expect next?

· How do we navigate these waters?

People may not like change but an organisation’s capability to change will indicate both skill and depth. Even the last two years have shown the rate of change:

· The Work from Home movement has come from advancement in technology which has empowered both the employee and the organisation. The question is can organisations now think differently about their own capabilities?

· New strategies. The above in turn is freeing up teams and business to think differently and create new strategies for themselves and their clients?

· New initiatives will emerge at a faster rate all the time. Competition will intensify

· A new workforce is emerging

What this all does mean?

In simple terms, the old days of having a set model is likely to be a barrier to success. It is almost now old school. Success in business is likely to be determined by 4 factors:

· Technological ability

· Strategic planning

· An engaged, empowered team

· Great communications with clients/customers.

It is a new era and requires new planning and solutions.